Monster hunting

The Terror of London

Facilitator: 
Chris Haddock

London, England, 2015

The latest headline in the Daily Mail read "Terror Killing Continues, Police Mystified" and went into morbid detail about the latest murder. Like all the others, this one was a wealthy but largely unknown businessman, murdered in his own home by an unknown assailant who left no DNA evidence or fingerprints of any kind, nor any indication of breaking into the victim's house. Each of the five victims had all been killed in the same way - their bones shattered and their bodies broken, looking like they had been beaten with a sledgehammer for a week.

In a rare example of perfect honesty, the Daily Mail was correct when it said police were mystified. In this modern age of forensic teams, in-depth analysis and the marvels of online records, it was odd that a crime scene would throw up no clue as to the nature of the attacker. But before consigning the murders to the realm of unsolved cases, Detective Inspector Pauline McCullough of Scotland Yard has turned to another side of investigations that she knows of.

She has turned to the Monster Hunters. You.

Monster of the Week is probably best described as "B Movie Gaming". It's absolutely raucous fun, and always comes with over the top shenanigans and intense confrontations. You play the part of a monster hunter, one of those who has seen the impossible, the paranormal or the eldritch. Each game plays like an episode of those Monster of the Week shows like Buffy The Vampire Slayer or Doctor Who. You identify the monster, find it, and stop it monstering. Simple as that.

This particular game is set in modern day London and well, the rest is spoilers. What is nice about MotW is that you don't need any form of preparation, you only need to bring 2 six sided dice and some monster hunting ingenuity (and I will provide the 2d6 if you need it!).

System: 
Monster of the Week

Ink Will Have To Do

Facilitator: 
Freya Sacksen

London, 1888. It's July, stinking hot, and the city is crawling with things that can't be mentioned - vampires, werewolves, mummies, succubi, fae (dark horrid things - in the Islands they know, but the upper classmen here sniff and tell tall tales)...

...and now dead prostitutes.

For one reason or another, you're getting drawn into petty mortal disputes that, you're to find, are far less petty than they seem, and far beyond mortal than they have any right to be.

System: 
Monster of the Week
Comments: 
I'd rather not have Peter Thomas, Sam Schenk or Stacey Nylund in either of my games, though if they're already in Dropping Like Flies, I understand and will cope.
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